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Revealing the art of managing money

By Cornish Guardian  |  Posted: September 11, 2013

  • FINAL STAGE: Jane Jiwa who launched The Art of Money Skills sessions, through Smart Savings.

  • ON SHOW: Some of the art created during the sessions which will be on display at the Old Press, St Austell

Comments (4)

A POP-UP exhibition in St Austell marks the completion of a project that uses art to help people with money and mental health issues.

The Art of Money Skills exhibition takes place at The Old Press, Biddicks Court, St Austell, between 11am and 4pm on Saturday, September 21.

The Art of Money Skills sessions, which began in January, was an innovative pilot supported by the Reaching Communities Big Lottery Fund and managed by a partnership of Smart Savings and Arts for Health Cornwall and Isles of Scilly.

Smart Savings was set up by Jane Jiwa after graduating from Cornwall School for Social Entrepreneurs, which received European Social Fund (ESF) Convergence support, to offer financial advice and training for people to find retail and hospitality jobs.

More than 20 people from St Austell and Redruth with mild to moderate mental health issues have been learning how to manage their money and increase and restore their mental wellbeing.

Jane said: "The exhibition celebrates outstanding artistic and personal achievements. The Art of Money Skills offered free, financial literacy workshops that used creative activities to tackle the notoriously dry subject of money, together with one-to-one counselling and debt advice."

Mark Yeoman, head of ESF Convergence communication, said: "Financial literacy is a key life skill that can help unlock the world of work and the independence and opportunities that follow."

The free exhibition features a selection of work from the sessions, from prints using a wide range of techniques on paper and cloth, to paper craft, clay work, photography and animation. More from Jane on 01209 212579.

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4 comments

  • saffron2013  |  September 11 2013, 6:32PM

    As part of the Welfare Reform Changes, peoples budgets are being squeezed this year as many are paying council tax for the first time, and many of those who were on DLA are being re-assesed with the move to PIPs - the body re-assessing has a target to cut the number of claimants. Also with Universal Credit due to start within the next year, the change to monthly budgeting means many of the vulnerable members of society, especially with mental health or addiction problems, are going to suffer as they are not used to large monthly sums of money. Unfortunately this may mean the likes of payday lenders and doorstep lenders are going to see an increase in business when people run out of money.

  • saffron2013  |  September 11 2013, 6:23PM

    "As part of the Welfare Reform Changes, peoples budgets are being squeezed this year as many are paying council tax for the first time, and many of those who were on DLA are being re-assessed with the move to PIPs - the body re-assessing has a target to cut the number of claimants. Also with Universal credit due to start within the next year, the change to monthly budgeting means many of the vulnerable members of society, especially with mental health or addiction problems, are going to suffer as they are not used to large monthly sums of money. Unfortunately this may mean the likes of payday lenders and doorstep lenders are going to see an increase in business when people run out of money.

  • saffron2013  |  September 11 2013, 6:22PM

    Aspart of the Welfare Reform Changes, peoples budgets are being squeezed this year as many are paying council tax for the first time, and many of those who were on DLA are being re-assesed with the move to PIPs - the body re-assessing has a target to cut the number of claimants. Also with niversal credit due to start within the next year, the change to monthly budgeting means many of the vulnerable members of society, especially with mental health or addiction problems, are going to suffer as they are not used to large monthly sums of money. Unfortunately this may mean the likes of payday lenders and doorstep lenders are going to see an increase in business when people run out of money.

  • BobToronto  |  September 11 2013, 3:31PM

    Wonderful, success to all! A thought, how many people with severe debt problems, bankrupt status are those with mild to moderate mental health issues? Perhaps collection agencies could be persuaded to reveal any stats they may have.

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