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Cornwall's new turbines are double the height

By Cornish Guardian  |  Posted: October 05, 2012

  • HITTING NEW HEIGHTS: The new turbines at St Breock Downs will be almost twice the height of the current structures, seen here. Our graphic below highlights the difference.

  • Giant - the new turbines will be almost twice the height of the current structures (pictured).

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FIVE of the tallest wind turbines in Cornwall will loom over the St Breock Downs skyline after an energy company was granted planning consent to erect them.

Renewable Energy Generation Limited (REG) has won approval for the 100-metre-high structures from Cornwall Council's Strategic Planning Committee.

The five new turbines will replace 11 presently on the site which were erected in 1994. The new structures will be almost twice their height.

In return for planning permission, REG has agreed to set up a community benefit fund for local projects which could result in £1.25 million being released over the next 25 years, the lifetime of the new turbines.

REG expects formal consent to follow shortly and, subject to the subsequent statutory three-month legal challenge period, anticipates the project moving into construction next year.

REG acquired the operating wind farm in 2010 with the aim of repowering the site to almost treble its energy generation. Andrew Whalley, chief executive officer for the company, said: "Achieving a resolution to grant permission at local authority is always welcome and we were heartened by the council's endorsement of our approach to local engagement and community benefits.

"Cornwall Council's decision is particularly pleasing as it demonstrates the value of our willingness to pursue less conventional projects.

"St Breock is an extremely energetic site and we will aim to progress the scheme into construction quickly, through our in-house team, once the statutory challenge period expires."

The planning application was supported by St Breock parish and Wadebridge town councils, but received seven objections from local residents.

The Campaign to Protect Rural England's Cornwall branch objected to the new turbines, saying they are too tall; that they will change the character of the surrounding countryside; and that the development will prove to be detrimental to an Area Of Great Landscape Value.

Cornwall councillor for the St Breock area, Jeremy Rowe, supported the planning application.

He said: "I had no problem with the new turbines but I must admit I was surprised there were so few objections to them. However, all the neighbouring councils supported the application.

"I'm particularly pleased the company will be including a community benefit fund as part of the planning consent which will be extremely helpful to the area," said Mr Rowe.

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  • mugshot  |  October 15 2012, 10:22PM

    Jeremy Rowe says he was surprised there was so few objections. I think that maybe not many people realised what was going on. Apparently there was a presentation in Wadebridge by REG but it escaped my notice, as I am sure it did with many other people. However, what we do know now, is that there is a pot of gold. Let's hope the public consultation on how this is spent, is better. I say spend it on camouflage paint!

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  • IvorWard  |  October 08 2012, 8:57AM

    I didn't realise that Cornwall was as cheap as a second class hooker. Guess who actually pays the £1.25 million bribe. We do...Out of our electricity bills and our taxes courtesy of that great friend of the windys, Liberal Democrat Ed Davey. Nice to get into office at last, is it Ed? Now you get to chuck some of our money around at your greeny mates; and all you ask in return is a few cheap bribes to the local Council. Perhaps we should send a dictionary to Cornwall Council. They could look up the word "Natural" as in Area Of Outstanding Natural Beauty. They could look up the word "subsidy" as in...Who is paying for these wind follies? They could look up the word "corruption"...as in ; How big a bribe should we offer to get our turbines placed here? Read this prior article: http://tinyurl.com/9snkpyb Cornwall will get its £1.25 million in blood money out of the £18 Billion a year which will be going to the wind subsidy farmers by 2020. Has anybody asked MP Rogerson what he thinks about the destruction of the natural beauty of his constituency or is he too busy keeping his head down below the height of the blades to avoid getting caught having an opinion?

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  • toffer99  |  October 05 2012, 12:43PM

    These must be the highest structures in Cornwall. Does anyone know of something else greater than 100 metres tall?

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  • Olly_Gark  |  October 05 2012, 8:42AM

    "In return for planning permission, REG has agreed to set up a community benefit fund for local projects which could result in £1.25 million being released over the next 25 years, the lifetime of the new turbines." That seems to be a rather small bribe considering the size of the tax payer funded subsidies that the vandals will receive (from us) to build and operate their inefficient windmills. Note too that thus 'fund' *may* (and therefore may not) provide the amount promised for 'local projects'. And who will benefit from these 'local projects' - local people or the usual scroungers with a hotline to a corrupt tame councillor or two? "REG expects formal consent to follow shortly and, subject to the subsequent statutory three-month legal challenge period, anticipates the project moving into construction next year." Don't count on it. The days when a a well targeted brown envelope or two could buy anything from Cornwall Council are rapidly coming to an end.

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